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News Service 22 – CIRCUIT TESTING GUIDE; ASQA – SELF REGULATION CONSULTATION; SMART & SKILLED 108; NCVER VET IN SCHOOLS REPORT; SAFETY INCIDENTS; ELECTRICAL LICENSING BREACHES; LOOKUPANDLIVE APP; ENA INDUSTRY AWARDS

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  1. DRAFT CIRCUIT TESTING MODEL FOR ELECTRICIANS
  2. ASQA – SELF REGULATION BACK IN VOGUE
  3. SMART AND SKILLED UPDATE NO. 108 – 4 AUGUST 2020
  4. NCVER REPORT – VET IN SCHOOLS
  5. SAFETY INCIDENTS – SHARING THE KNOWLEDGE
  6. QUEENSLAND – ELECTRICAL LICENSING DISCIPLINARY ACTION
  7. SAFEWORK NSW – MORE WORKERS FALLING THROUGH ROOFS IN NSW
  8. QUEENSLAND – LOOKUPANDLIVE.COM.AU WEBSITE NOW AN APPLE APP
  9. ENERGY NETWORK INDUSTRY AWARDS 2020

1. DRAFT CIRCUIT TESTING MODEL FOR ELECTRICIANS

The Electrical Safety Project (ESP) group have recently helped develop a draft best model guide for Circuit Testing for electricians.  The guide, “Circuit Testing Best Practice Model for Electricians” has been developed to augment existing practices covering Certificate of Compliance for Electrical Work (CCEW) requirements, and to promote improved understanding and encourage best practice in electrical installation compliance testing.  A copy of the latest version of the guide is attached for your consideration and review.

We invite industry practitioners to review the guide and provide feedback as to its validity and currency.

Please provide feedback to tony@uensw.com.au by Friday, 28th August 2020 COB.  In the meantime please feel free to contact the undersigned for more information or clarification or visit the website for related information: www.esproject.com.au


2. ASQA – SELF REGULATION BACK IN VOGUE

ASQA released a ‘Consultation Paper’ on the 3rd August 2020.  Its media release states, “This next step in our reform work in response to the Rapid Review sees ASQA working with the VET sector to gain a shared understanding of self-assurance. As part of the consultation, we are also seeking examples of self-assurance measures providers might already use to drive quality, together with feedback on how the annual declaration of compliance can be improved to support self-assurance.

ASQA wants to work with the sector to understand how we can support providers in building capability for self-assurance, through critical examination and continuous improvement of practices for sustained compliance, to produce quality outcomes for students, employers, and the community.

We have released this consultation paper to help build a shared understanding of self assurance.

You can submit feedback on this consultation paper here.”

The Consultation Paper titled, “Working Together Towards Effective Self-Assurance”, Version 1.0, July 2020 is attached and can also be accessed from the ASQA website at: WORKING TOGETHER TOWARDS EFFECTIVE SELF-ASSURANCE

ASQA outlines three reasons for proposing a new approach recognising that, “regulatory approach has not always specifically focused on provider self-assurance, the expectation for providers to quality assure their operations has always formed part of the VET regulatory framework.”  It provides three examples to evince its statement:

  • “Standard 2 of the Standards requires that ‘the operations of the RTO are quality assured.’
  • The ELICOS Standards require registered providers to have ‘management systems that are responsive to the needs of students, staff and stakeholders and the environment in which the provider operates’, and which include ‘a systematic and continuous improvement approach to managing its operations’.
  • The National Vocational Education and Training Regulator Act 2011 also explicitly states that one of the functions of ASQA is to ‘promote, and encourage the continuous improvement of, an RTO’s capacity to provide a VET course or part of a VET course’.”

Further on in the paper ASQA outline a staged approach in intends to take to increasing their focus on effective provider self-assurance, at page 3.  It provides a three step process of moving towards self-regulation over time, outlining an initial consultative step, followed by a medium-term (2021 onwards) step, followed by a loner-term (3 to 4 years) step of realising an outcome where, “providers will have strong systems of self-assurance to identify (and fix) problems or issues before they are identified by ASQA” along with a series other highly claimed quality outcomes that self-regulation brings.

Submit your response to this consultation paper by filling out our online submission form at: www.asqa.gov.au/form/have-your-say-self-assurance.

The consultation period will run from Monday 3 August to Monday 31 August 2020.

Given the VET system reform agenda, has been an ongoing story of more than 20 years with enormous amount of corporate history generated of the key goals and objectives of the reforms and study after study, one has wonder how is that, ASQA established in July 2011, we are now returning our focus on a model that did not work – self-regulation?  Evidence from overseas practices, for instance the UK have discontinued this approach for more improved models of RTO audits.  It will be interesting to learn of the submissions made.  Most likely many RTOs with self interest would prefer a return to self-regulation.  Maybe consideration should be given to other forms and models that may also involve industry SME practitioners in determining if RTOs are meeting quality outcomes in terms of technical content and not just process.  This might be a more pertinent approach for a VET system than the current model in place.

If you have a strong sense of interest in this subject, please ensure you participate in the consultation process by reviewing the Consultation Paper and making a submission.


3. SMART AND SKILLED UPDATE NO. 108 – 4 AUGUST 2020

Please find attached Smart and Skilled Update No. 108, which covers the following:

Training Needs Identification (TNI) part qualification funding for priority skills sets –
drought support, bushfire recovery and COVID-19 response.

  1. Change in funding status and listing of Priority Skills Sets
    1. How to submit TNI applications for these Priority Skills Sets
    1. Revised listing of Priority Skills Sets at Appendix A

For technical support regarding this update, please contact Training Market Customer Support at Training.Market@det.nsw.edu.au

For more information visit the Smart and Skills section of Training Services NSW website: SMART AND SKILLED


4. NCVER REPORT – VET IN SCHOOLS

NCVER have released their latest VET in Schools statistical report.  NCVER states, the “publication presents information on VET in Schools, the vocational education and training (VET) undertaken by school students as part of their senior secondary certificate of education. The VET in Schools arrangement offers two main options: students can undertake school-based apprenticeships and traineeships; or they can take VET subjects and courses as part of their school curriculum (the latter is referred to as ‘other VET in Schools programs’).

Highlights

In 2019, there were:

  • 235 800 VET in Schools students
  • 17 100 school-based apprentices and trainees, representing 7.3% of all VET in Schools students
  • 218 700 students undertaking other VET in Schools programs, representing 92.7% of all VET in Schools students.

In 2019, compared with 2018, VET in Schools students increased by 2.2%.

From 2015 to 2019, VET in Schools students decreased by 8.3%.

For a copy of the report and the data, as well as the “DataBuilder” which users to quickly create customised tables using the latest VET in Schools data, filter by a selection of variables and compare training activity over time go to the following URL: VET IN SCHOOLS 2019 DATA

REPORT – VET in Schools


5. SAFETY INCIDENTS – SHARING THE KNOWLEDGE

The NSW UE ITAB has been fortunate to gain permission from the ‘Blue Scope Steel’ to share with our News Service recipients their monthly experiences in Electrical Incidents.  The aim is to help RTOs and industry practitioners have available, real case electrical incidents that occur in workplaces that they can show case in their programs or safety moments to highlight findings and how responses are actioned to occurring events.

The NSW UE ITAB sincerely thanks Blue Scope Steel For this permission, and advises RTOs and industry practitioners to ensure they recognise attribution to Blue Scope for sharing this information and treat the information for educational purposes only. 

As we receive the incident reports we will share them accordingly.

For this News Service we have two reports covering June and July 2020.  For more information and Blue Scope contact details please refer to the undersigned for more information.

JUNE INCIDENTS JULY INCIDENTS


6. QUEENSLAND – ELECTRICAL LICENSING DISCIPLINARY ACTION

The Queensland Electrical Regulator reports of six cases in May and June 2020, the Electrical Licensing Committee took to disciplining electrical license holders of electrical practice breaches.  Three example cases are cited below.  All can be accessed from the following URL:  ELECTRICAL LICENSING DISCIPLINARY ACTION

  • An electrical worker failed to identify electrical risks and implement safe systems of work when he installed a new main switchboard and submains. The submains were connected with incorrect polarity, resulting in the earthing system becoming live.

The property manager and worker received shocks because the worker didn’t complete all mandatory tests, so the reverse polarity wasn’t identified.

The worker’s licence was suspended for six months and he must complete competency units prior to the suspension being lifted. He was also fined $400 which will be listed on the licensing public register for three years.

  • An electrical contractor had inadequate testing procedures and did not provide sufficient on-going staff training to ensure workers’ competency. He assigned an electrical worker to complete a new main switchboard upgrade as part of a solar PV system install.

The electrical worker and property manager received shocks because the worker didn’t compete all mandatory tests, so a reversed polarity on the submain wasn’t identified. The worker left the submain to the residence isolated and advised the owners to engage a local electrical contractor to investigate further.

The electrical contractor failed to adequately audit the employee’s work in the field to ensure procedures, legislation and Australian Standards were met.

The contractor’s licence was suspended for six months, with a requirement for all qualified technical persons (QTPs) to complete competency units. The contractor must also provide confirmation of completed jobs by the electrical worker prior to the incident that show compliance to the Electrical Safety Regulation 2013, as well as complete two approved electrical safety systems audits from an independent auditor and pay a $1,200 fine which will be listed on the licensing public register for three years.

  • An electrical worker failed to adequately supervise an electrical apprentice and take precautions to prevent de-energised equipment from being inadvertently re-energised while the apprentice was connecting two socket outlets.

Undertaking a separate task, the worker isolated the power before he worked on an air conditioning system at the switchboard. After connecting the air conditioning system, the worker reinstated supply to the installation while the apprentice was still working. As a result, the apprentice received a shock and sustained burns.

The worker’s licence was suspended for six months and he was disqualified from being a QTP for six months. He must complete competency units prior to the suspension and disqualification being lifted. He was also fined $400 which will be listed on the licensing public register for three years.


These cases demonstrate that there is a strong need to raise the level of consciousness amongst industry practitioners about safe work practices and testing competence, as well apprentice supervision.  The Electrical Safety Project (ESP) has a focus to promote better practice and knowledge sharing to improve practices.  The aim is to showcase these issues and show how other jurisdictions are addressing serious electrical safety breaches that too must occur in NSW and little is known about them in the public arena, with a view of encouraging NSW regulators to work towards more public information, and improving inspection and compliance audit activities.


Queensland to observe Electricity Safety Week

Please note that Queensland will observe Electricity Safety Week 2020 from 7–11 September.  To get involved in Electricity Safety Week, with free online events tailored for industry leaders, electrical workers, contractors and apprentices visit: REGISTER FOR ELECTRICAL SAFETY WEEK


7. SAFEWORK NSW – MORE WORKERS FALLING THROUGH ROOFS IN NSW

SafeWork NSW advises that “since the start of this year, SafeWork NSW has been notified of 10 separate serious incidents where a worker has fallen through a roof, resulting in either a serious injury or fatality. Falls from heights continues to be a major cause of fatalities and serious injuries at workplaces across NSW.”  A copy of the incident report is attached.

In the latest incidents:

  • Sydney: A 52-year-old subcontractor fell 3.5 metres onto concrete pavement at a school in Wahroonga.
  • Molong: Last month a 21-year-old apprentice carpenter fell through perspex roof sheeting at a manufacturing plant in central western NSW.
  • Alectown: In May, a 27-year-old roofing contractor fell 3.6 metres through a roof of a sheering shed on a rural property near Parkes.


SafeWork NSW, provides a timely safety information reminder:

“Not all areas on a roof are safe to walk on. Even roof sheeting that claims to be okay to walk on is reliant on correct installation and can become brittle over time. Don’t walk on skylights, or plastic and asbestos roof sheeting, unless assessed as structurally sound by a competent person.”

For more information:

View the latest incident information releases at: www.safework.nsw.gov.au

For electrical workers the Electrical Safety Project (ESP) website provides a series of safe work procedures that can be used by small business and workers to help improve understanding of the procedures that can be used to minimise risk to incidents and unsafe work practices, visit the Safe Work Procedures tab  in the website: www.esproject.com.au


8. QUEENSLAND – LOOKUPANDLIVE.COM.AU WEBSITE NOW AN APPLE APP

Energy Queensland reports that the www.lookupandlive.com.au website is now in an Apple App at:  https://apps.apple.com/au/app/look-up-and-live/id1519374756 

You might recall in an earlier News Service 16, it was reported, that Ergon Energy had produced a very interesting and important safety video that was worth exploring its principles of operation.  Whilst it is applicable to Queensland, there were some good ideas espoused therein and worthy of knowing about it.

In the video, Community Safety Specialist Glen Cook demonstrates the powerline mapping tool at www.lookupandlive.com.au.

To view the video go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1MNInpkjd8M&feature=youtu.be

For more information visit the lookupandlive website at: https://ergon.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=5a53f6f37db84158930f9909e4d30286


9. ENERGY NETWORK INDUSTRY AWARDS 2020

Energy Networks Australia’s 2020 annual awards applications close on 18 August 2020.

There are two awards:

  • The Consumer Engagement Award recognises an Australian energy network business that is demonstrating outstanding leadership in consumer engagement.
  • The Industry Innovation Award recognises leadership in the design, development and application of a ground-breaking Australian energy network initiative, technology, service or solution.

Energy Networks Australia members are invited to apply.

Key dates:

  • Applications close – 18 August 2020 
  • Shortlisted applicants announced – 4 September 2020
  • Videoconference interview for shortlisted applicants – 10 September 2020
  • Winners announced – October 2020