Advisory Services T: +61 2 9736 2111

News Service 38 – Survey results show room for improvement, Campaign to shine light on electrical risks, Work-based education in VET, Career event, Feedback for Generation TP & ASQA compliance policy, Safety matters & electrical safety podcast, Technology, Training matters

0 Comments

  1. SURVEY 2 RESULTS ARE IN – ELECTRICAL SAFETY PROJECT (ESP)
  2. NEW CAMPAIGN SHINES LIGHT ON ELECTRICAL RISKS
  3. NCVER REPORT – WORK-BASED EDUCATION IN VET
  4. TRADES FOR FUTURE EMPLOYMENT
  5. FEEDBACK SOUGHT – ESI GENERATION TRAINING PACKAGE
  6. ASQA LAUNCHES CONSULTATION PAPER ON DRAFT COMPLIANCE POLICY
  7. DEPUTY PREMIER OF NSW REPORTS ON REVIEW OF WHS LAWS
  8. WORK-RELATED TRAUMATIC INJURY FATALITIES AUSTRALIA 2019 REPORT
  9. DEALING WITH WORKPLACE BULLSHIT
  10. TEST DRIVING EV HOME CHARGING TECHNOLOGIES
  11. SAFEWORK NSW – ELECTRICAL SAFETY IN CONSTRUCTION (PODCAST)
  12. DANGERS OF WORKING IN CEILING SPACES
  13. WILL YOUR SAFETY GLOVES MEET THE NEW AUSTRALIAN STANDARD?
  14. ELECTRICAL SAFETY RECALL – CIRCUIT BREAKER
  15. RTO PARTNERSHIP WITH INCREMENTAL SYSTEMS CORPORATION (INCSYS) & POWERDATA CORPORATION

1. SURVEY 2 RESULTS ARE IN – ELECTRICAL SAFETY PROJECT (ESP)

As advised in News Service 37 the Electrical Safety Project in addition to releasing a ‘Charter’ for advancing electrical safety for industry and consumers, a concurrent survey was conducted to elicit views and feedback on series of important issues of concern to the industry.  The survey results are in and have been compiled.  The following findings ensued:

In terms of testing, there are strong concerns about electricians’ performance in testing, and strong support for more comprehensive reporting in CCEWs.
About half of the respondents claimed to provide some asbestos safety training, and 90% agree that it is necessary.
70% do not believe that electricians are generally confident about which tests are required for different jobs and how they should be conducted.
Holding and electrician’s licence is a sufficient indication of competence.18% agree
Electricians undertaking testing should be assessed regularly.65% agree
Electricians undertaking testing should receive regular refresher training.80% agree
Electricians undertaking training should always have access to AS/NZS 3017.83% agree
74% support having as CCEW for every job.
92% believe that test results should be recorded on a test results form.
What should be on the report form?
– who undertook the testing and when98% agree
– who was responsible for the final design85% agree
– does the installation comply with the design90% agree
– does the equipment in the installation comply with Australian Standards95% agree
– list of all the tests undertaken and the results achieved100% agree
In larger premises/installations, should there be a separate report (CCEW) for each switchboard.95% agree
Current regulations relating to testing are effective, fair and reasonable.33% disagree
Are all electricians in your company required to have completed a program on undertaking minor works on asbestos containing materials (ACMs).50% claim to
Do you believe that all electricians should complete such a program.88% agree

Clearly, there is some room for improvement, and actions are needed to address some startling results.  The ESP Group will review the findings and look to develop responses and/or pursue actions that will address some of the key issues identified.

A point of note is that some respondents provided valuable written feedback in addition to the programmatic form responses.  The ESP Group commends and thanks those that took the time to respond to the survey and those that provided the detailed feedback.  The sample size of the survey was 41.  Some examples of the descriptive responses provided, are listed below for information:

When is CCEW Not Required

  • Not for replacing electrical appliances such as stoves, hot water system
  • Only when additions alterations and major repairs have been carried out, i.e.
  • Because of poor enforcement by regulators electricians don’t bother and take the risk.
  • General maintenance and minor repairs
  • I believe they are aware though may still not fill them out.
  • If the electrical work requires the person to be licensed then a certificate should be issued and this includes restricted licence holders
  • Like for like replacement
  • Small additions with no significant additional loading.

Record test results

  • This is most definitely due to more self-compliance on oneself  (?)
  • It depends on the complexity of the installation. Separate test results may be required.

General comments on testing

  • I believe a lot of testing is not undertaken because of the effort or how it slows the job down, even though most elecos know the rules.
  • Most electricians have doubt or just unable to understand the AS3000 Section B and become somewhat confused – more time should be spent on AS3000 and AS3017 during TAFE
  • Not enough testing is being done
  • If we had a firmer inspection regime here in NSW, testing (or lack thereof) would be far less of a problem than what it is now.
  • Unclear difference between testing and live work – some believe testing with a probe for power/no power is live testing – not testing isolation is achieved.
  • Regulations are there but not monitored or enforced.
  • Some electricians are not overly familiar with electrical testing principles and commissioning processes, Unless they are regularly conducting testing and commissioning activities and are trained specifically for the testing and commissioning performed; some electricians conduct mainly rough in and maintenance works and therefore lack relevant experience and specific training in testing and commissioning principles.
  • Documentation requirements should be improved, it will be little additional burden to the electrician to write down the results. I endorse the test fork produced by the ESP.
  • The regulations are adequate. The ack of auditing is the issue.
  • I think that there are significant number of electricians that don’t know how to test. More importantly, I don’t think there is much testing occurring at all – based on the number of defects that I find on a daily basis.
  • Also, on compliant equipment. There is quite a difference between states, and I pulled up a supplier because they didn’t have a NSW number on the appliance. The compliance numbers on the device were not relevant to NSW. The supplier was able to supply me a paper one to attach to the appliance. But this is an example of how onerous this can be, particularly as the rules between each state are so different.

The findings are highly reflective of anecdotal information and feedback ESP Group members have gathered over some time and enunciated in communications and meetings.  The findings and the many and varied points raised will inform the policy development of the ESP Group on related matters. 

It should be recalled that the Electrical Safety Project (ESP) Group has established a website for the industry, RTOs and consumers, that is a handy resource at: www.esproject.com.au.  The site provides information about improving electrical Safe Work Practice and exemplar Safe Work Procedures (SWPs) for use in training, or adaptation by micro-businesses and self-employed in the utilities and electrotechnology industries.

The ESP Group appreciates any feedback on the quality, validity and usefulness of the website as a resource.


2. NEW CAMPAIGN SHINES LIGHT ON ELECTRICAL RISKS

It might be recalled that the Minister for Better Regulation, Kevin Anderson, launched in early November a SafeWork NSW campaign, “to reduce risk electrical work”.  It was reported in News Service 36.  The Service stated, that the, “Minister for Better Regulation, Kevin Anderson, said for the rest of 2020, SafeWork NSW inspectors will be conducting drop-in inspections across a range of sites to check they have the right controls in place to manage electrical risks”.  Link to the 9th November 2020 Media Release: NEW CAMPAIGN TO REDUCE RISK ELECTRICAL WORK

To augment the SafeWork NSW campaign the Minister has also now announced a further campaign which, “shines light on electrical risks”.  The Media Release published on the 24th November 2020 states, “The NSW Government is urging consumers to have safety switches installed in their homes as part  of a new campaign doubling down on electrical safety.”  The media release goes on to state, “The campaign, led by NSW Fair Trading and SafeWork NSW, seeks to promote the importance of a safety switch in every NSW home.

Minister for Better Regulation, Kevin Anderson, said this campaign is in response to several fatalities caused by house fires and faulty wiring in residential properties.

“Electrical faults and appliances are a common cause of house fires in NSW every year but they don’t need to be,” Mr Anderson said.

“All of these fires could have been prevented by the simple installation of a safety switch, which is designed to turn off the electricity supply in milliseconds if an electrical fault is detected.”

The new campaign will be delivered with a number of industry partners including unions, energy retailers and CHOICE to educate and encourage NSW homeowners to install switches and to undertake regular checks.

“Hiring a licensed electrician to install safety switches in your home will cost a few hundred dollars – but it could save your life,” Mr Anderson said.”

“DIY electrical work is illegal and could easily result in a house fire if the work is faulty putting your home and loved ones at serious risk,” Mr Anderson added.

“Before you engage an electrician, visit the Fair Trading website to check they hold a valid licence to do the job and a Certificate of Compliance for Electrical Work (CCEW), which electricians are required to provide when the work is complete, to ensure it complies with safety guidelines.”

For a copy of the Media Release and the full article visit: NEW CAMPAIGN SHINES LIGHT ON ELECTRICAL RISKS

The Media Release is augmented with a series of resources and promotional material that can be used by electrical contractors, electricians, stakeholders and consumers to promote the ‘safety switches protect you’ message.  These cover the following topics:

The NSW UE ITAB welcomes the Minister’s initiative and supports programs that improve electrical safety both in terms of consumers and the industry.  It includes the provision of relevant, timely and most current training and assessment technics and practices that leads to confidence in the quality, validity and credibility of competent persons in the industry.  The NSW UE ITAB will be keen to learn of the effectiveness of the campaign over time and look to identify the key outcomes that were achieved during the life of the campaign.


3. NCVER REPORT – WORK-BASED EDUCATION IN VET

NCVER has recently published and released a new report (19 November 2020) that explores the benefits and challenges associated with work-based education that has been identified in prior research.  The Report, also sets out best practices for training providers, employers and policy makers to support quality work-based education across the VET system.  It is authored by Kristen Osborne, Maree Ackehurst, Leesha Chan and Rose-Anne Polvere.

The Report describes what work-based education is in the context of VET, stating, “we use the term ‘work-based education’ to describe structured programs that include learning through work, often resulting in a qualification.”  Historically it reports that, “A wide variety of terms are used to refer to work-based education: from the specific — apprenticeship, traineeship or internship — to the general — work-based learning, work-based training and work-integrated learning.

It states in its introduction, “The inclusion of work as a distinct component of an education program is a key element of a successful vocational education and training (VET) system. … The benefits of work-based education for students include smoother transitions into ongoing employment and the development of broad occupational skills.  Employers benefit from productivity gains through ‘work-ready’ recruits, having current employees upskilled in the workplace, and the more effective transfer of skills learned in the classroom to work tasks. …

The challenges of work-based education for employers relate to costs and resourcing.  For training providers, on the other hand, resourcing and coordination of placements are areas identified as problematic. Students are constrained by motivation and access to work-based education opportunities.”

Highlights of the report includes:

  • “Work-based education can lead to better employment outcomes for students and provide employers with workers who have skill sets relevant to the employer’s industry and workplace gained through structured training.
  • The extra resources required to successfully host a student mean that cost is often a barrier to work-based education faced by employers. Targeted financial incentives can assist in addressing this, enabling a wider range of businesses to access students for participation in work-based education programs.
  • Communication and coordination are key to quality work-based education in VET. The roles and expectations for all involved should be made clear before training begins, and regular communication between training providers, employers and students is key to successful work-based programs.

The Report includes a series of case studies, challenges and best practices worthy of a review, and which can be used to promote the benefits of work-based education in the context of VET.

To access a copy of the report visit the NCVER URL and download the report: NCVER REPORT – WORK-BASED EDUCATION IN VET


4. TRADES FOR FUTURE EMPLOYMENT

Superior Training Centre (STC) has advised that it will conduct a ‘Trades for Future Employment” forum.  The open Forum aims to discuss a range of career and upskilling options and opportunities for employers, job active providers, community groups and institutions.  The event will be held as follows:

What day: Wednesday, 16 December 2020

What time: 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm AEDT

Where: Wests Leagues Club, 10 Old Leumeah Road, Jacaranda Room, Leumeah, NSW 2560.

Theme: want to know how to become an electrician, air conditioning mechanic, metal fabricator. Businesses- do you want to upskill staff?

See attached flyer for more information or contact STC at info@stc.nsw.edu.au or call Milica on (02) 9618 6809.

Please register as number of spots is limited.  Link to: TASTE OF TRADES FOR FUTURE EMPLOYMENT TICKETS, WED 16/12/2020 AT 5:00 PM | EVENTBRITE

RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/taste-of-trades-for-future-employment-tickets-129939752297


5. FEEDBACK SOUGHT – ESI GENERATION TRAINING PACKAGE

Australian Industry Standards (AIS) advises that, “on behalf of the ESI Generation Industry Reference Committee, Technical Advisory Committees (TACs) have drafted Training Package materials for the Operations Personnel and Remote Area Essential Service projects and would like your feedback.

  • Feedback is sought for Operations Personnel:

The Operations Personnel TAC has amalgamated six existing qualifications into a Certificate III, IV and Diploma in ESI Generation, with streams for Operations and System Operations. The changes are aimed at enabling greater workforce mobility within the generation industry.

View draft materials and submit feedback OPERATIONS PERSONNEL HERE

  • Feedback is sought for Remote Area Essential Service Personnel:

The Certificate II in Remote Area Essential Service qualification has been updated through revised electives to create clear vocational pathways and enable employment opportunities for remote area communities.

View draft materials and submit feedback REMOTE AREA ESSENTIAL SERVICE HERE

Please submit your feedback by close of business Monday, 4 January 2021.

For more information on these projects, please contact the Industry Manager: sch Schmidt, Industry Manager – Electrotechnology, Electricity Supply & Gas

M: 0417 568 967 | E: klausch.schmidt@aistnds.org.au


6. ASQA LAUNCHES CONSULTATION PAPER ON DRAFT COMPLIANCE POLICY

ASQA has launches a new round of stakeholder consultation.  It has released a consultation paper on its draft ASQA Compliance Policy.  In its Media Release it states, “The consultation paper contains 11 questions that we would like our stakeholders to respond to. One of the key processes we are seeking feedback on is ‘undertakings to remedy’.”

What is ‘undertakings to remedy’?

The ASQA website states, “Currently, providers have 20 working days in which to address any non-compliances identified by ASQA. While non-compliance can often be addressed within this timeframe, significant changes are sometimes required across the organisation to implement a more systemic response to the non-compliance.

Where a provider has demonstrated that they are committed and capable (and the non-compliance is such that an undertaking is appropriate), they may be given the option of entering into an undertaking to remedy.

Undertakings to remedy enable providers to acknowledge the non-compliance and to enter into an agreement with ASQA to remedy the non-compliance within an agreed time period (for example, up to six months).”

Stakeholders are invited to review the consultation paper and provide feedback so that ASQA can, “build a culture of effective self-assurance and compliance with the sector”.

The proposed new approach is expected to commence from April 2021 and cover:

  1. Broader range of compliance monitoring and assessment activities
  2. Education and engagement as a critical part of our regulatory approach
  3. Greater focus on self-assurance and continuous improvement
  4. Describing the regulatory pyramid
  5. Undertakings to remedy

Visit the link and download the Consultation paper and Draft Compliance Policy:  ASQA’S APPROACH TO COMPLIANCE CONSULTATION

You can submit your feedback on our compliance policy consultation paper via an online form. There are 11 questions in total, and responses can be submitted until midnight, 10 January 2021.

Submission form:  SUBMIT YOUR FEEDBACK


7. DEPUTY PREMIER OF NSW REPORTS ON REVIEW OF WHS LAWS

The Australian Mine Safety Journal reports the latest developments regarding recommended improvements to the Work Health and Safety (Mines and Petroleum Sites) Act 2013 and Work Health and Safety (Mines and Petroleum Sites) Regulation 2014 (WHS (MPS) laws).  The article states, “The report on the statutory review of the Work Health and Safety … laws was tabled in parliament by the Deputy Premier of New South Wales on 10 November 2020.  The review found the objectives of the Act are valid and its terms generally appropriate for securing those objectives. The review also made 40 recommendations for improvements to the operation of the laws.

In early 2021, the NSW Resources Regulator will consult industry stakeholders about 15 of the recommendations, which proposed legislative amendments. The balance of the recommendations will be implemented by the Resources Regulator, Mine Safety Advisory Council and Mining and Petroleum Competence.

The report made 40 recommendations for the WHS (MPS) laws; of those recommendations, the Resources Regulator will implement 25, which include reviewing legislation and, in collaboration with other jurisdictions, will review existing guidance material and develop new guidance material.

Further consultation with industry stakeholders is required for the other 15 recommendations, as they are complex and may require legislative reforms. Subject to the outcomes of the consultation, the Resources Regulator will progress amendments of the WHS (MPS) laws.”

Read more at this link:  DEPUTY PREMIER OF NSW REPORTS ON REVIEW OF WHS LAWS


8. WORK-RELATED TRAUMATIC INJURY FATALITIES AUSTRALIA 2019 REPORT

SafeWork Australia advises that it has released its 2019 ‘Work-related Traumatic Injury Fatalities Australia’ report.  The Report provides the latest detailed national statistics on all workers and bystanders fatally injured at work. 

The Media Release states, “The 2019 report shows that over the last decade, the number and rate of work-related fatalities have been gradually decreasing.

In 2007, the fatality rate was 3.0 fatalities per 100,000 workers.  In 2019, this rate has decreased by 53% to 1.4 fatalities per 100,000 workers. The number of work-related fatalities recorded in 2018 represented an unusual decrease compared to the longer-term trends in fatality numbers.

While the number of work-related fatalities has been steadily decreasing over the last decade, any workplace death is tragic and unacceptable. Understanding the causes of injury and the industries most affected can help reduce work-related fatalities.”

Importantly, the following key statistically observations are highlighted from the report:

“In 2019, 62% of worker fatalities occurred in the following industries:

  • Transport, postal and warehousing (58 fatalities)
  • Agriculture, forestry and fishing (30 fatalities)
  • Construction (26 fatalities)

The most common causes of worker fatalities in 2019 were:

  • Vehicle collisions (43%)
  • Falls from a height (11%)
  • Hit by falling objects (11%)

SafeWork Australia states, “This report complements and provides additional detail to the Key Work Health and Safety Statistics published on 12 October 2020.”

For more information visit the following URL: WORK-RELATED TRAUMATIC INJURY FATALITIES AUSTRALIA 2019 REPORT


9. DEALING WITH WORKPLACE BULLSHIT

The Australian Mine Safety Journal latest report contains an interesting article on dealing with bullshit in the workplace.  It reports on a work undertaken by researchers in Canada, Italy and Finland, which “have finally laid bare the fact that organisations across the world are “dealing with a flood of bullshit” and that bullshit is affecting morale and performance in organisations”.

“Bullshit has become so commonplace that it is suggested that business communications are dominated by truthiness (in which the validity of something is based on how it feels), post-fact language (taking a position that ignores facts), and echo chambers (where positive- feedback loops create cravings for and fuel the spread of bullshit; Berthon & Pitt, 2018)”

The article goes onto cover:

  • How to recognise workplace bullshit?
  • The impact of bullshit on workplace safety
  • Surveys readers as to whether there are “too many “safety bullshitters” in the mining industry?”

Whilst on face value the article may seem a little obnoxious there is a level of underlying reality to the perils of the modern workplace that give succour to such notions.  The article is definitely worth a read and provides a timely reality check on perceptions of hypocrisy we sometimes encounter in the workplace and something we should strive to recognise and address where possible.

The full article is available at: DEALING WITH WORKPLACE BULLSHIT


10. TEST DRIVING EV HOME CHARGING TECHNOLOGIES

Electrical Connection’s reporter, Sean Carrol explores the recent announcement by the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) of a $2.9 million investment for AGL Energy Services (AGL) to undertake a large scale EV charging trial across NSW, Queensland, Victoria and SA.

The article states, “As part of the $8.25 million trial, AGL will recruit 300 EV owners to demonstrate a range of smart and managed charging solutions including 200 smart chargers in owners’ homes, a software-based smart charging trial involving 50 EVs and EVs to participate in a vehicle-to-grid (V2G) trial to assess the commerciality.

AGL is contributing $5.3 million towards the trial which also involves project partners JET Charge, Chargefox and FlexCharging and a cohort of distribution networks. ARENA’s funding will support charging hardware costs, installation costs and software development.

The project will be the first time V2G EVs will be deployed in a residential content in Australia as well as the first time smart charging will come to Australia via software, potentially removing the need for additional smart charging hardware in the future.”

“AGL general manager decentralised energy resources Dominique Van Den Berg says AGL was excited to partner with ARENA to understand when and how customers charged their EVs, which will become a larger part of the energy market as their take-up increased.

“This trial will demonstrate how we create value using customers’ distributed energy assets like batteries and share the value with them,” she says.

“We’ll be talking to customers during the trial to understand how they feel about smart charging so we can improve their experience.

“Although the trial is limited to 300 customers, it will help us to shape future energy offers to EV owners.”  This is a new niche market for electrical contractors and electricians as EV penetration up expands across the country, placing greater demand on the network.

Read Sean’s the full and interesting article at:  TEST DRIVING EV HOME CHARGING TECHNOLOGIES


11. SAFEWORK NSW – ELECTRICAL SAFETY IN CONSTRUCTION (PODCAST)

Steve Maher joins Ryan Tinker to discuss Electrical Safety in the construction industry.  WorkSafe NSW has created podcast stream as an additional platform to educate and drive safety awareness in the workplace.  There have been four episodes in the first season launch of the new series.  This additional means of communication to the broad industry stakeholder groups and the community in general is a positive development and SafeWork NSW is commended for the effort.

The promotion for the podcast states it is about, “ Safety Education in Construction & Building”.  Further, it highlights that in “the current climate all organisations, industry groups and PCBU’s need to find innovative ways to engage with their customers and stakeholders”. The Construction Services Group (CSG) of SafeWork NSW who inaugurated the podcast series has advised, that it, “ will continue to engage with its stakeholders through the delivery of content for “toolbox talks” in the form of audio files and podcasts.”

Two of the last five podcast in Season 1 relate to electrical safety: SafeWork NSW – ‘Electrical Safety in Construction’ and ‘Take 5 – Electrical Safety in Construction’.

For the link to the link to the recent episodes visit the following link: SafeWork SafetyCast

For the specific electrical podcasts click on the links below and utilise the relevant platform to your liking:

  1. SafeWork NSW – ‘Electrical Safety in Construction (18.18 min)
  2. Take 5 – Electrical Safety in Construction (4.54 min)

Steve Maher is well versed in the Electrotechnology industry and has a long standing understanding and experience of the workplace, electrical apprenticeships and safety related matters.  He is a wealth of information and in his role he conducts many apprentice education programs.  RTOs should review the two podcasts and use them in their teaching and learning activities, and moreover, should look to invite Steve to present before learners and candidates the SafeWork NSW policies on electrical safety and electrical risk mitigation case studies.

Steve can be contacted at SafeWork NSW or contact if it might be a little difficult, email Tony Palladino at NSW UE ITAB to help you contact him.


12. DANGERS OF WORKING IN CEILING SPACES

The Electrical Safety Office of Queensland has highlighted the dangers of working in ceiling spaces in its latest eSafe Electrical news service.  It stated, “A telecommunications worker received burns when he came into contact with a rodent-damaged cable while installing CCTV in a ceiling space.  The exact cause of the incident is still being investigated.

This is a stark reminder of the hidden dangers of working in ceiling spaces.  If you need to work in a ceiling or roof space, make sure you turn off all the main power switches at the switchboard first.

Even with the power off at the switchboard, avoid contact with electrical cables and equipment as some circuits, like service lines and solar PV cables, will still be live.

It is a good idea to use torches and cordless tools so you don’t need power when you’re working in the ceiling space.”

For more information on the incident and recommended hazard considerations when working in ceilings visit the following link:  DANGERS OF WORKING IN CEILING SPACES


13. WILL YOUR SAFETY GLOVES MEET THE NEW AUSTRALIAN STANDARD?

The Australian Mine Safety Journal reports on SafetyMate’s recent advisory of a new Australian Standard that is likely to be released at end of 2020, which will overhaul current Australian legislation to mirror standards already in place throughout Europe.  The new rating will provide:

  • more accurate simulation of real life cut dangers, and
  • an additional cut (TDM-100) rating and an optional impact rating.

The Australian standards will mirror the European standard EN388:2016.  The new Australian Standards are in final stages and are expected to be published by end 2020.

For more information visit: NEW AUSTRALIAN STANDARD SAFETY GLOVES


14. ELECTRICAL SAFETY RECALL – CIRCUIT BREAKER

Product Safety Australia has issued a product recall alert NUMBER 1478 for the Transco Electrical Residual Current Device combined with Miniature Over Current Circuit Breaker (RCBO) – 3kA single pole plus neutral breaker.

Identification: Brand Transco

Model: RCDMCB10S/RCDMCB16S/RCDMCB20S

Batch number: 201811 marked on product

Defect: The product does not comply with the relevant mandatory electrical safety

standard. The device may not provide circuit protection.

Hazard: Risk of electric shock, which can cause serious injury or death.

Action Required: Consumers should stop using the product immediately and contact Magical Electrical Pty Ltd to arrange to return the product to the place of purchase for a full refund or replacement.

Contact Details: For further information, please contact Magical Electrical Pty Ltd by phone on 02 9057 9047 (Monday to Friday, 9.30am – 4.30pm AEST) or email maksim.feng@transco.net.au

Full product electrical safety alert can be accessed at: ELECTRICAL SAFETY RECALL

See www.productsafety.gov.au for Australian product recall information


15. RTO PARTNERSHIP WITH INCREMENTAL SYSTEMS CORPORATION (INCSYS) & POWERDATA CORPORATION

RTO Thomson Bridge has announced that it has partnered with North American power grid simulation and training specialist IncSys to create Power Grid Training for renewable energy generators.  It states in its  Media Release that it, “is launching a new training series to address the principles and practices of Australian power grid dynamics specifically designed for the renewable generation sector.

Instructor facilitated workshops will focus on the roles, responsibilities and challenges for wind and solar generators. Our courses aim to provide insight into the dynamics of voltage control, security and reliability that impact on decision making.

Training is targeted to renewable plant/ site managers who are monitoring their site electrically, and senior decision makers managing renewable portfolio assets.

We have sought a highly experienced partner in this journey, and joined forces with North American power grid simulation specialists, Incremental Systems Corporation (IncSys) and PowerData Corporation.”

For a full copy of the Press Release follow the link:  PARTNERSHIP WITH INCREMENTAL SYSTEMS CORPORATION (INCSYS) AND POWERDATA CORPORATION