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News Service 54 – UEE TP Workshop Newcastle 4 June, Trainers needed, RAC Apprentice injured arc flash company to pay $150,000, Safety News, CCN & ARC inspiring next generation RAC apprentices, DESE updated skills reform, Hydrogen, ASNZS3017 public comment

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  1. UEEE TRAINING PACKAGE PRACTITIONER WORKSHOP – NEWCASTLE 4 JUNE 2021
  2. TRAINERS NEEDED IN HVAC, ELECTRICAL, AND METAL FABRICATION
  3. DO YOU HAVE A PASSION FOR MENTORING AND TEACHING OTHERS @ NECA?
  4. RAC APPRENTICE INJURED IN ARC FLASH INCIDENT – COMPANY ORDERED TO PAY $150,000
  5. WHS MINISTERS AGREE ON MEASURES TO IMPROVE WHS OUTCOMES ACROSS AUSTRALIA
  6. DANGEROUS INCIDENT U/GROUND METALS MINE – BASKET DROPS 3.5M
  7. INSPIRING NOMINEES FORE THE RAC NEXTGEN 2021
  8. DESE – UPDATE ON SKILLS REFORM
  9. HYDROGEN: THE FUTURE’S FUEL TODAY
  10. STANDARDS AUSTRALIA SEEKS PUBLIC COMMENTS AS/NZS 3017:202X

1. UEE TRAINING PACKAGE PRACTITIONER WORKSHOP – NEWCASTLE 4 JUNE 2021

Reminder that the NSW Utilities & Electrotechnology Industry Training Advisory Body (NSW UE ITAB) will hold a second Electrotechnology Training Package practitioner workshop.

The Workshop will be held in Newcastle on Friday, 4th June.  Details are:

DAY:Friday
DATE:4th June 2021
TIME:10.00AM TO 2PM (30-MINUTE LUNCH BREAK)
VENUE:TAFE NSW Newcastle
(Tighes Hill)
Building M, room M1.06 Building M is via Chin Chen Street, Islington and using the car park on the left, adjacent to Building M.  Campus map is attached highlighting the building and parking area.
WHO CAN ATTEND:All stakeholders are welcome – TAFE NSW staff, Private RTO staff, Training Services NSW staff, employers, unions, etc.
MEDIA:Flyer attached.
RSVP:COB Friday, 28 May 2021

The workshop will explore and hold discussions with regional practitioners about issues associated with the roll-out and implementation of Electrotechnology Training Package UEE20, particularly the new workplace evidence requirements and likely impact on resourcing.  As well, other related Utilities Training Packages and associated issues including apprenticeship mode, apprenticeship funding, workplace evidence gathering mechanisms preferred by the industry, mutual recognition of licenses and licensing/training matters in general.

If you are able to attend, please confirm your interest and potential for attending by emailing Tony at: tony@uensw.com.au

Note:
It is intended that other regional events will be held progressively, in a series of workshops, leading to a major forum in Sydney, sometime in the third quarter of 2021.


2. TRAINERS NEEDED IN HVAC, ELECTRICAL, AND METAL FABRICATION

Superior Training Centre (STC) is looking for trainers in HVAC, electrical, and metal fabrication.  If you are interested or know someone interested contact Mila at Superior Training Centre for more information on the criteria and applicable conditions.

RTO ID: 41122 (Cricos provider 03591C)

T: 0296186809

E: milica@stc.nsw.edu.au

A: Unit 1, 13 York Rd, Ingleburn, NSW 2565

W: http://www.stc.nsw.edu.au


3. DO YOU HAVE A PASSION FOR MENTORING AND TEACHING OTHERS @ NECA?

NECA Training and Apprenticeships has an opening for two new roles. 

Previous training experience is unnecessary as long as you have a passion for teaching others and broad experience in the electrical industry.

These roles would suit someone that wants to get off the tools and move into a training/mentoring role. 


4. RAC APPRENTICE INJURED IN ARC FLASH INCIDENT – COMPANY ORDERED TO PAY $150,000

The District Court of NSW has ordered a Refrigeration and Air Conditioning (RAC), company ‘RAC XXX’ to pay a fine of $150,000.00.  The Court found in its judgement that (extracts from the decision and transcript below):

  1. On 25 October 2017 at KFC Restaurant, New South Wales, ‘RAC XXX COMPANY’ being a person conducting a business or undertaking, who had a health and safety duty under s 19(1) of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (NSW) (‘the Act’) to ensure so far as was reasonably practicable the health and safety of workers engaged at work in the business or undertaking, did fail to comply with that duty and the failure to comply with that duty exposed workers, in particular apprentice AA and apprentice MM to a risk of death or serious injury contrary to s 32 of the Act.
  2. On 25 October 2017 at KFC Restaurant, New South Wales, RP being an officer of RAC XXX COMPANY, who had a health and safety duty under s 27(1) of the Act to exercise due diligence to ensure the company complied with its duty under s 19(1) of the Act, failed to comply with his duty and the failure to comply with that duty exposed workers, in particular apprentice AA and apprentice MM to a risk of death or serious injury contrary to s 32 of the Act.
  3. The offence carries the maximum penalty of $1,500,000.00 for the corporate defendant and $300,000.00 for the individual defendant.
  4. On 7 December 2020 the defendants entered pleas of guilty.

Background

  • Apprentice AA was a 21-year-old fourth year apprentice and apprentice MM was a 15-year-old first year apprentice.
  • On 11 October 2017, CT, an employee of RAC XXX COMPANY, attended KFC Restaurant and diagnosed a fault in the electrical system of the store’s air conditioning.  CT was an air conditioning and refrigeration technician, but he was not an electrician. A ‘work solution’ was prepared to replace a three-phase circuit breaker, contactors and overloads and this was communicated to store Manager and Service Operations Manager that day. It was intended that CT would return and perform the works.
  • On 25 October 2017, CT rang in sick.  Between 6:30am and 7:00am, the Service Operations Manager remotely allocated the work at KFC to apprentice AA and apprentice MM.
  • Apprentice AA had been told by RAC XXX COMPANY to turn off live installations before working on them, however, apprentice AA commenced work on the main switchboard in light of the store manager’s request without isolating the power.
  • Shortly before 9:24am, apprentice AA removed the faulty three-phase circuit breaker from the main switchboard. The new circuit breaker was the wrong size and apprentice AA attempted to manipulate the busbar terminals to allow it to fit. In doing this, the tip of steel pliers came into contact with live power and created a loud ‘arc flash explosion’.
  • The tip of the steel pliers, apprentice AA was holding melted under the temperature from the arc flash and the insulated handles were blackened. The area around the main switchboard where the arc flash explosion occurred was also blackened.
  • Apprentice AA was temporarily blinded and transported to Hospital A and then another Hospital B and underwent surgery and required skin grafts to treat burns to exposed hands and all of the fingers. Apprentice AA’s eyes were stinging for numerous days. Apprentice AA was not wearing protective gloves or goggles, but was wearing a long sleeve jumper which insulated the arms, long pants and safety boots.
  • Apprentice MM, who had been standing behind apprentice AA, sustained no physical injury because of the distance from the arc flash, however, suffered shock.

Electrical Work – systems of work before the incident

  • RAC XXX COMPANY had procedures in place at the time of incident, including Electrical Safety Policy, SWP011 Electrical Safety and Electrical Safety Tips. They also had an on-site procedure to isolate mains and follow directions. However, there was no safe work method statement or a comprehensive work health and safety management plan to provide guidance and procedures to ensure apprentices should not have been allocated certain work that they were unqualified to do.
  • RAC XXX COMPANY did not employ an authorised electrician after 27 July 2017 following the resignation of TB, RAC XXX COMPANY’S former electrician.  All employed apprentice electricians could only carry out electrical work under the supervision of a person with a prescribed qualification. Following TB’s resignation, RAC XXX COMPANY ‘engaged’ TB for a short time to provide ‘mentoring’ of RAC XXX COMPANY’S workers, supervision by telephone and site visits.  RP (defendant) continued to direct RAC XXX COMPANY to engage in electrical work with the knowledge that the company no longer employed a licenced electrician.
  • RAC XXX COMPANY relied on the Service Operations Manager who was not qualified to carry out electrical or refrigeration and air conditioning work, to quote jobs, order electrical parts and allocate work tasks to workers of RAC XXX COMPANY.  The Service Operations Manager quoted and accepted the electrical installation work at KFC and was aware the work involved the main switchboard. The work required an electrician and could not be carried out by apprentices who were unqualified without a qualified supervisor.
  • Apprentice AA received limited direct face-to-face supervision as an apprentice and lacked confidence in removing panels from a main switchboard but was capable and competent in isolating electrical installation. This was the first circuit breaker apprentice AA replaced on a main switchboard.

Qualifications and Supervision

  • RAC XXX COMPANY did not ensure apprentice AA had the necessary qualifications to perform electrical wiring work, nor did they provide adequate supervision to apprentice AA and in turn, apprentice AA was not qualified to supervise apprentice MM.
  • RP (defendant) did not provide RAC XXX COMPANY with the essential supervision, qualifications and up-to-date knowledge of work health and safety matters and industry guidelines involving apprentices and their supervision. RP (defendant) did not provide RAC XXX COMPANY with appropriate resources in terms of persons with the prescribed qualifications and/or experience to supervise apprentices.

This is an extremely interesting case on many, many levels and the full District Court’s transcript is worthy of a read to understand the circumstances that led to the incident, including the background and deliberations, and most importantly how the judgement was arrived at.  The incident serves as an excellent case study for RTOs and a timely reminder for employers, to use in their learning or work activities as to why it is important to develop and comply with safe systems of work, and regulatory requirements.  Learners, management and employees should be invited to unpack the many issues that the court was presented with, identified, and which in the end resulted in prosecution and a hefty fine.  A critical aspect of the learning should be about the requirements of apprentice supervision and any decision permitting apprentices to work unsupervised.

The full transcript can be accessed at:  SAFEWORK NSW V ULTRA REFRIGERATION PTY LIMITED ISSUED 20 APRIL 2021


5. WHS MINISTERS AGREE ON MEASURES TO IMPROVE WHS OUTCOMES ACROSS AUSTRALIA

Work Health and Safety (WHS) Ministers met on Thursday, 20 May 2021 and issued a communique` of the outcomes of the meeting.  The Federal Minister for Industrial Relations, Michaelia Cash issued a media release stating, “Very productive discussions with my state and territory counterparts at yesterday’s Work Health and Safety (WHS) ministers meeting”, with Ministers agreeing to a significant number of measures to improve WHS outcomes across the country.”

Minister Cash said, “that Ministers considered the recommendations from the review of the model WHS laws undertaken by Marie Boland and agreement was reached for action on all of the 34 recommendations.

Safe Work Australia (SWA) will now progress those recommendations agreed by the Ministers.

The Morrison Government is committed to ensuring there are strong deterrents in place and that the community has confidence in Australia’s WHS laws.

Ministers unanimously agreed to introduce gross negligence (or equivalent) as a fault element in the Category 1 offence in the model WHS laws.

A majority of ministers also agreed to the Commonwealth’s proposal for Safe Work Australia to consider significant increases to the fines and imprisonment term for Category 1 offences in the model WHS laws.

Category 1 offences apply when a worker is killed at work or suffers serious injury or illness, or is exposed to such risks.”

The Communique` stated that a majority of Ministers:

  • Agreed to introduce gross negligence as a fault element in the Category 1 offence in the model WHS laws.
  • Agreed to the Commonwealth’s proposal for Safe Work Australia to consider significant increases to the fines and imprisonment term for Category 1 offences in the model WHS laws.
  • Endorsed the National Principles to Support Families Following an Industrial Death.
  • Agreed to amend the model WHS Regulations to deal with psychological injury.

Agenda items covered during the meeting included i) the Model Law Review; ii) Rider safety in the gig economy; and iii) Sexual harassment in the workplace.

For more detailed information and a copy of the Communique` visit:  WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY — MINISTERS MEETING COMMUNIQUÉ


6. DANGEROUS INCIDENT U/GROUND METALS MINE – BASKET DROPS 3.5M

The NSW Resources Regulator reports in its Mine Safety News of an underground metals mine dangerous incident (IncNot0039872) of two electricians in a man-basket of a telehandler, which dropped approximately 3.5 metres.  The article stated, “Two electricians were in a man basket, attached to the extended boom of a telehandler, when the basket dropped to the ground.

When the boom was extended, the telehandler overbalanced, causing the basket to drop to the ground and the rear of the telehandler to lift. The basket dropped approximately 3.5 metres at a slow rate. The outriggers of the telehandler had not been extended due to the tight working location.”

Advice to the industry from the regulator stated, “Before completing a task, a risk assessment tool must be used, and control measures put in place for identified risks. If identified controls such as outriggers are installed and cannot be used, additional control measures must be identified and implemented through a risk management process. Operators must be trained in identifying when a risk is present and how to control the risk. OEM recommendations must be taken into account when developing procedures for tasks.”

For more information regarding the weekly reportable incident summaries visit the WEEKLY INCIDENT SUMMARY URL and click on the requisite week ending report ISR21-19.


7. INSPIRING NOMINEES FORE THE RAC NEXTGEN 2021

Sandra Ross, Editor at Climate Control News (CCN), reports that CCN has partnered with peak industry body the Australian Refrigeration Council (ARC) to launch NextGen 2021.  Sandra’s article states, “Together, ARC and CCN, are working to address the current RAC skills shortage with grass roots initiatives such as NextGen where we can showcase industry excellence.

As part of NextGen we are searching for Australia’s best apprentices under the age of 25.

The search covers every state and territory in Australia, but be warned, there is only a few weeks to nominate so don’t waste any time get your entries in at www.climatecontrolnews.com.au/nextgen

Nominations are open to male or female apprentices (under the age of 25) who have demonstrated excellence in all aspects of their trade and training.  Help identify a suitable nominee!!!

Entries close 25 June, 2021.

The winners, who will be our Top 20 under 25, will be profiled in this magazine, online and across a number of social media platforms.

For more information visit:  GET INSPIRED WITH NEXTGEN 2021


8. DESE – UPDATE ON SKILLS REFORM

The Department of Education, Skills and Employment (DESE) has issued an official update on feedback it has received during the first phase of Skills Reform consultations.  The circular states, “we are turning our focus to reporting back to the sector what we have heard so far from stakeholders. This will be an opportunity for us to share with you some key findings and outcomes from consultations.”

DESE also referred to the 2021-22 Budget Statement regarding revelations of proposed industry engagement reforms and a move toward the establishment of a small number of industry clusters to replace the current Industry Reference Committees (IRCs) and Skills Sector Organisations (SSOs).  That is, “$149.2 million over four years will be invested to support new industry engagement arrangements for the VET system, enhancing the role of industry and improving governance. Industry clusters will be established to ensure a strong, strategic industry voice, drive collaboration across sectors, address workforce challenges, and improve the speed to market of qualifications to meet evolving industry needs.”

What DESE heard

  • Addressing the changing skills needs of employers and individuals: Qualifications Reform

The Australian, state and territory governments have agreed that an immediate priority under the Heads of Agreement for Skills Reform is to simplify and streamline national VET qualifications.

Skills Ministers recognise the importance of retaining and building upon the existing strengths of the VET System and are guiding this work to modernise training product design. A particular focus of qualification reform is to consider new approaches that will better meet the needs of employers and learners now and in the future.  To find out what the respondents said, you can read the article here.

  • Moving towards better industry engagement in VET

Industry plays a critical role in specifying the skills needed today and into the future. Enhancing industry engagement is a key reform measure in the Commonwealth, State and Territory governments’ Heads of Agreement for Skills Reform.

The Agreement seeks to reform the VET system to ensure it is delivering for learners and employers and can support Australia’s immediate economic recovery and future prosperity.

Employer satisfaction in VET has fallen over the past decade from 86.3% in 2009 to 78.8% in 2019. A

To find out what the respondents said, you can read the article here.

  • DESE invites you to share your story: Have you been involved in effective collaboration and innovation in the VET sector?

DESE States, that it wants, “to hear your stories about effective collaboration between stakeholders in the VET sector and innovative practices which contribute to high-quality training delivery.

Sharing your story will help us to understand how good collaboration and innovation helps to achieve better outcomes for learners, employers and Australian workplaces.”

Complete a Good Practice Story Submission Form here.

Want to know more?

DESE invites those that would like more information on Skills Reform, to visit skillsreform.gov.au.  For those looking to receive further updates on opportunities to provide feedback, subscribe here.


9. HYDROGEN: THE FUTURE’S FUEL TODAY

EnergyInsider the weekly newsletter from the Energy Networks Australia (ENA) and Australian Energy Council (AEC) contains an article on hydrogen, a possible future fuel of today.  The article states, “South Australian energy customers will be cooking with green gas from this week, with emissions-free hydrogen supply starting in Adelaide at Australian Gas Networks’ Hydrogen Park SA project.

This hydrogen blending initiative demonstrates that hydrogen use in Australia is not some far away fantasy but a reality. … Industry led, Gas Vision 2050 outlines this roadmap and highlights the important role hydrogen will play in a zero-emissions future.

A key part of this journey is to demonstrate the role of hydrogen for homes, businesses and industry. The logical steps are to start with renewable gas blends in networks, then to demonstrate 100 per cent renewable gas in dedicated towns or regions and ultimately to convert all existing networks to 100 per cent renewable gas.

The Hydrogen Park – South Australia (HyP SA) project started blending five per cent hydrogen into the residential gas network at Tonsley Park, Adelaide, SA on Wednesday 20 May 2021.”

READ MORE

For more, contact Dennis Van Puyvelde, Energy Networks Australia


10. STANDARDS AUSTRALIA SEEKS PUBLIC COMMENTS AS/NZS 3017:202X

Public comment is sought for revised draft of AS/NZS 3017:202X Electrical installations – Verification inspection and testing.  Closing date for public comments is by 01/07 2021.

View the draft and comment at https://www.standards.org.au

  1. Go to Standards Australia website – https://www.standards.org.au
  2. Click on ‘Committee Access
  3. On drop down menu, click on ‘Public comment’ (via Connect)
  4. If you are not registered, you will need to register got Public comments.
  5. Search for 3017 and review the documents and comment as per the ‘Connect’ system arrangements.