Advisory Services T: +61 2 9736 2111

| Careers

0297362111

| Skills & Quals

accounts@uensw.com.au

News Service 97 – Electrical Inspector Jobs, Electro Update, Gov VET funding, No Skills Deal, Tight job market, Women in Riverina, TAFE Talks, ERAC News

uensw  > News headlines >  News Service 97 – Electrical Inspector Jobs, Electro Update, Gov VET funding, No Skills Deal, Tight job market, Women in Riverina, TAFE Talks, ERAC News
0 Comments

DOWNLOAD A COPY OF NEWS SERVICE 97 – HERE

1. UEE ELECTROTECHNOLOGY TRAINING PACKAGE UPDATE TO RELEASE 3.2

Australian Industry Standards (AIS) has advised that the Electrotechnology Training Package (UEE) has been updated to Release 3.2. 

The advice states, “Since publishing release 2.0 of the UEE Electrotechnology Training Package in October 2020 some Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) have expressed concerns about implementing the assessor and/or evidence gathering requirements in 15 Units of Competency linked to Electrical Licencing.

At their February 2022 meeting the Australian Industry and Skills Committee (AISC) approved an Industry Proposal for the Electrotechnology Industry Reference Committee (IRC) to direct Australian Industry Standards (AIS) to update the Assessment Conditions in the relevant units via a Minor Change to the Training Package. The unit codes will remain unchanged.

Since this approval, the Electrotechnology IRC and AIS have been working with stakeholders and finalised amendments that address concerns of impacted RTOs. The amendments clarify which items require evidence to be gathered in authentic workplace conditions, and which can be simulated.

The following units of Competency have been updated and published in training.gov.au as Release 3.2 of the UEE Electrotechnology Training Package:

  • UEEEL0003 Arrange circuits, control and protection for electrical installations
  • UEEEL0005 Develop and connect electrical control circuits
  • UEEEL0008 Evaluate and modify low voltage heating equipment and controls
  • UEEEL0009 Evaluate and modify low voltage lighting circuits, equipment and controls
  • UEEEL0010 Evaluate and modify low voltage socket outlets circuits
  • UEEEL0012 Install low voltage wiring, appliances, switchgear and associated accessories
  • UEEEL0014 Isolate, test and troubleshoot low voltage electrical circuits
  • UEEEL0018 Select wiring systems and select cables for low voltage electrical installations
  • UEEEL0019 Solve problems in direct current (d.c.) machines
  • UEEEL0020 Solve problems in low voltage a.c. circuits
  • UEEEL0021 Solve problems in magnetic and electromagnetic devices
  • UEEEL0023 Terminate cables, cords and accessories for low voltage circuits
  • UEEEL0024 Test and connect alternating current (a.c.) rotating machines
  • UEEEL0025 Test and connect transformers
  • UEEEL0047 Identify, shut down and restart systems with alternate supplies

For more information on this update, please contact the Industry Skills Specialist, Paul Humphreys on M: 0429 670 588 | E: paul.humphreys@aistnds.org.au


2. ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR VACANCIES – ACT

Access Canberra Electrical Inspections are launching an advertising campaign to recruit two (2) Electrical Inspectors to replace inspectors who will soon retire from their jobs as electrical inspectors. 

There is one permanent position available from early November and a second expected vacancy available from January 2023.

The electrical Inspections team is looking for an electrician with extensive experience in the electrical industry undertaking electrical inspections and verification of electrical installations. The successful applicant will join a high performing team, working independently but in a collaborative environment, ensuring the safety of our community. Electrical inspectors work a 9-day fortnight, with some allocated overtime. The successful applicant is also required to be part of an after-hours On-Call roster for which an allowance is paid.

Eligibility/Other requirements: You will need to have or be eligible for an ACT Unrestricted Electrical Licence, and a Drivers Licence.

A link to the Electrical Inspector Full-time Permanent advertisement is below:  http://www.jobs.act.gov.au/jobs/chief-minister-treasury-economic-development/permanent/20540,-several

Closing Date: 19 August 2022

All ACT Government jobs are advertised on Home – Careers and Employment (act.gov.au) or https://www.jobs.act.gov.au/home.


3. CLAIRE FIELD ON THE DIFFERENT STATES OF TAFE STUDENT GROWTH

The 21 July 2022 edition of Campus Morning Mail includes commentary from Claire Field, who dissects and explores in more detail the VET government data that was released last week by NCVER.  Claire notes, that the “Data demonstrates why the former federal government struggled to impose a more nationally consistent approach to VET funding.”

The article goes on to state, “Last week the National Centre VER released the latest government-funded VET statistics, which showed a total of 1.25m students enrolled in government-funded VET in 2021, a 5 per cent increase on 2020.

While there has been a 12 per cent increase in government-funded TAFE students between 2017 and 2021, there was a modest decline (-2 per cent) between 2020 and 2021. During the five years to 2021 there was a 19 per cent increase in government-funded students studying with private VET providers and a 20 per cent decline in government-funded students at community providers.” …

Looking beneath the national figures, government-funded students in TAFE declined between 2017 and 2021 in South Australia (-16 per cent), Tasmania (-6 per cent), Western Australia (-5 per cent) and the ACT and NSW (by just -1 per cent in each jurisdiction). Queensland however has the lowest proportion of government-funded students enrolled in TAFE – with just 39 per cent of all government-funded Queensland VET students studying at TAFE, compared with 56 per cent enrolled at private providers (albeit TAFE’s share has increased from 34 per cent in 2017).

Also of note is the change in the number of government-funded VET students in each jurisdiction between 2017 and 2021. On this measure the Northern Territory is the outlier – with government-funded students dropping from 21 905 to 16 625. Victoria also saw a decline (-1 per cent) in government-funded places, due in part to the higher costs involved in funding its Free TAFE commitments. All other jurisdictions increased the number of VET students they funded over the five years to 2021, some by a considerable amount.” …

The proportion of the working age population in each State and Territory funded to undertake a VET course in 2021 ranged from a high of 11% of the working age population in South Australia to a low of just 4% in Western Australia. 

Figure 3: Proportion of working population in government-funded VET (2021)

READ MORE HERE


4. NATIONAL SKILLS AGREEMENT COMMUNIQUE

The National Skills Ministers met on Wednesday, 20 July 2022 to discuss the National Skills Agreement.  The concluded with a Communique that was high on positive prospective actions to move forward to negotiate a reset and strengthening of VET, but low on substance. 

The Communique states, “Federal and State Skills and Training Ministers met today to reset negotiations on the National Skills Agreement, and strengthen Australia’s TAFE and training sector.

Ministers agreed that cooperation on strengthening the skills sector is critical to addressing skills shortages and creating a more productive economy, and undertook to work together in a genuine partnership, and develop joint ambitions for our skills system.

All jurisdictions confront skills and labour shortages across multiple industries and workforce pressures.

According to the OECD, Australia is experiencing the second most severe labour shortage in the developed world.

Nine out of ten jobs of the future will require a vocational education and training (VET) qualification or a university degree.

The wide-ranging discussion made it clear that it is critical the Australian workforce is equipped with the right skills now and into the future.

Ministers committed to working in partnership to continue to grow the pipeline of skilled workers and prioritise skills reform through a collaborative and coordinated negotiation process.

READ MORE HERE


5. RECRUITMENT DIFFICULTY POINTS TO CONTINUED TIGHT LABOUR MARKET

The National Skills Commission (NSC) has released its latest Recruitment Experiences and Outlook Survey which continues to pointy to an ongoing tight labour market.

The media report states, “Recruitment activity for June 2022 remained high at 58%, just below last month’s record high of 59%.

The rate of recruitment difficulty stood at 67% of recruiting employers (representing 39% of total employers), also slightly below last month’s peak. The rate was slightly higher in Rest of State areas (67%) than in Capital Cities (66%).

Recruitment difficulty has increased for casual positions, with the rate of difficulty increasing from 55% to 61% over the month, compared with a fall from 74% to 69% for non-casual positions.

In June 2022, 15% of employers had increased staffing levels over the past month (an equal high), while 8% had decreased staffing levels.

There has been some easing in future staffing expectations. Some 28% of employers expected to increase staffing levels over the next 3 months, a decline from 32% in May 2022 and from 36% in April 2022.”

The National Skills Commission surveys approximately 1,200 employers each month to find out about their experience when recruiting staff as well as whether they are expecting to increase staffing levels.

READ MORE HERE


6. FOCUS ON WOMEN IN MAE RIVERINA SHOWCASE DAY

The Agrifood and Electrotechnology ITAB’s will host FREE showcase days for Manufacturing, Agrifood and Electrotechnology (MAE) industries in partnership with Casella’s Family brands.

An exclusive event for female participants aged 16-64, careers advisors & influencers.

Held in the Riverina (Yenda) in industry, attendees will have the opportunity to:

  • meet and talk with female industry leaders
  • gain hands-on experience
  • access the latest career information
  • ask questions and have them answered by industry experts
  • register and reserve a place for obligation free opportunities to do work experience with local MAE industries
  • free networking lunch

Showcase day participants numbers are limited and registrations are essential.

WHEN: Wednesday, 31 August 2022, 9:30 am to 2.00pm

REGISTER NOW FOR THIS FREE AND EXCITING EVENT

For more information contact Melissa by email mae@agrifooditab.com.au or call 0421830056; or visit the agrifooditab website

Download the flyer here


7. GRANTS FOR NSW SMALL BUSINESS MONTH

Grant applications are now open for November 2022 program.  Small Business Month advises that, “Grants of up to $5,000 for chambers of commerce, industry associations, not-for-profit organisations and NSW local councils are available to help them organise events for the sixth NSW Small Business Month in November 2022.” 

NSW Small Business Month will be held from 1-30 November 2022.

NSW Small Business Month aims to help NSW’s small businesses Connect for Success.  By attending NSW Small Business Month events small businesses learn new skills and new ideas to help them navigate the road ahead and get the opportunity to connect and collaborate with other small business owners and operators.

The even it organised by NSW Small Business Month on behalf of the NSW Government, who is the only dedicated festival of activities entity for small businesses in NSW.

“Don’t miss out on this opportunity to support the state’s hardworking small business owners Connect for Success this November. Activity ideas could be a marketing workshop, lunch and learn networking session, how to sell online your products webinar or an expo day with keynote speakers.

Grant applications will close at 5pm AEST on 5 August 2022.”

See more information, read the grant guidelines and apply for a grant through the website.

Learn more about Small Business Month

Read all about NSW Small Business Month on the website.

You can also email smallbusiness.month@smallbusiness.nsw.gov.au or call them during office hours on 1300 795 534.


8. NATIONAL SKILLS WEEK 2022 (22-28 AUGUST)

SkillsIQ in its latest July eNews reports on the upcoming National Skills Week event in August.  The report states, “There’s still time to get involved in National Skills Week, being held 22-28 August with the theme, ‘A Universe of Skills: Go Beyond Your Imagination.’ 

This week-long event is dedicated to raising the profile and status of vocational learning, dispelling outdated myths and raising awareness of the myriad rewarding, lucrative and prestigious careers available. The challenge is to provide potential students, parents and carers with clear information on possible career pathways, training options, emerging new skills areas and VET courses.

To get involved, you can register your event on the National Skills Week website so others can attend. You can showcase your organisation or industry by championing the career paths and opportunities available through vocational education and training. You can engage with your local school or training organisation to hold an event to promote vocational education through pathways, apprenticeships, traineeships, school-based programs and share inspiring stories. You can even get the media involved in your event.

Email info@nationalskillsweek.com.au for ideas and resources that may help you or you can conduct a social media campaign during the week to highlight skills and training in your organisation and profile your people. Check out Facebook and Instagram #nationalskillsweek for more ideas.”

READ MORE HERE


9. TAFETALKS – THE SCHOLARSHIP OF TEACHING AND LEARNING

TDA Australia will again host another of its excellent TAFE Talks.  Focusing this event on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

The event will be held on Wednesday 27 July at 2.00pm AEST (Canberra/Melbourne/Sydney time).

REGISTER HERE

Join Professor Sally Kift and a panel of distinguished speakers for a discussion on the scholarship of teaching and learning.

Sally is a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA), a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Law (FAAL) and President of the Australian Learning and Teaching Fellows (ALTF). Sally is a renowned higher education expert and academic and has published widely on transition pedagogy, legal education and student transition. Sally was a member of the Australian Qualifications Framework Review Panel that reported to Government in September 2019.

Other members to participate in the event will include: Associate Professor Melanie Williams, Associate Dean (Scholarship) at William Angliss Institute; Dr Fiona Wahr, Senior Lecturer, Applied Research and Scholarship, Melbourne Polytechnic; and Vanessa Crawford, Associate Dean, Higher Education, TAFE Queensland.

Register now as places are filling fast!! REGISTER HERE


10. DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION IS MORE ABOUT PEOPLE THAN TECHNOLOGY

The 21 July 2022 edition of Manufacturers’ Monthly highlights the release of a new report by Ai Group’s Centre for Education and Training (CET) about the scale of the digital transformation opportunity (and challenge) before the industry. 

The article refers to the Ai Group’s head of Education & Training and executive director of the CET, Megan Lilly who said, “Digital transformation presents an incredible opportunity to grow and reshape our economy for the better, but the secret to unlocking this potential lies with people, not machines”.

“We conducted interviews and case studies with 18 Australian companies drawn from a broad cross section of Ai Group’s membership.”

“According to Lilly, the report found:

  • The pandemic has been an incredible catalyst for change
  • For these businesses, adopting, and adapting to new technologies in recent years has:
    • Driven demand for entirely new skillsets in a relatively short time;
    • Required existing jobs to be re-designed;
    • Changed the role and function of managers;
    • Driven cost savings;
    • Caused shortages in “in demand” skills; and
    • Caused businesses to focus more on training and development.
  • As COVID-19 turned more businesses towards e-commerce, many needed a range of new skillsets, such as marketing, distribution and logistics, website building and maintenance, and data intelligence and analytics.
  • Digital transformation has changed the roles of managers considerably

A copy of the full report can be downloaded from within the article.

READ MORE HERE


11. CPD FOR ELECTRICAL WORKERS

EnergySafe Victoria is rolling out its Continuing Professional Development (CDP) program across Victoria in 2022 to 2023, following a successful pilot completed by 66 electrical workers. EnergySafe states in its latest EnergySafe Magazine (Issue 66 Winter 2022), written by Stephen Yolland, Senior Communications Advisor, CPD, “After a successful pilot program in which 66 electrical workers participated in venues around regional and metro Victoria, the program is being rolled out across Victoria in 2022-23, incorporating important findings from the pilot. 

Feedback from pilot participants was that the course content was informative, useful and enjoyable.

Why is CPD being introduced?

The industry is technically complex, sometimes hazardous and subject to regulatory changes. It’s also a rapidly changing industry, which requires electrical workers to stay up-to-date with the latest regulations and ongoing technological advancements. 

CPD is supported by the Government, unions and employers.  …  CPD addresses the ‘Three Cs’ – Currency, Competency Fade and Complacency.”

Attending a CPD course is now required for the following electrical licences and classes of electrical licence:

  • Electrician’s licence;
  • Electrician (Supervised) worker’s licence;
  • Electrical switchgear worker’s licence;
  • Restricted electrical worker’s licence (Class 1);
  • Restricted electrical worker’s licence (Class 2);
  • Class “L” inspector’s licence;
  • Electrical inspector’s licence (Class G);
  • Electrical inspector’s licence (Class M);
  • Electrical inspector’s licence (Class H); and
  • Electrical inspector’s licence (Class V).

DOWNLOAD A COPY OF ENERGYSAFE MAGAZINE – ISSUE 66 HERE

With the Home Building Act (HBA) under review and consideration being given to the introduction of CDP in NSW, it is worth noting and learning from the pilot undertaken by EnergySafe Victoria.  CPD is timely and the lessons learnt in Victoria will be very important and should inform the NSW approach.

It is understood that the Home Building Act (HBA) Review is before the Minister awaiting approval the draft proposals of the new Act for public release and Public Comment. 

READ MORE HERE


12. NEW ERAC ADVISORIES FOR SWITCHBOARDS, RCDs AND PV CABLES

Sean Carroll, Editor at Electrical Connections reports in the 18 July and 22 July 2022 editions of two recent Electrical Regulatory Authorities Council (ERAC) advisories.  The first covers switchboards and RCDs and the second photovoltaic (PV) cables.

12.1. ADVICE ON ALTERATIONS AND RCDS

The first relates to the “new guidance on the requirements of AS/NZS 3000:2018 A2, Clause 2.6.3.2.5

The purpose of this advice is to provide a consistent approach across Australia and New Zealand to the interpretation and implementation of Clause 2.6.3.2.5 Alterations to installations and replacement of switchboards — Australia only.

Feedback from the industry has indicated that there may be a misinterpretation of the intent of this clause. As ERAC was instrumental in the motivation of introducing RCD into existing installations, they felt it essential to provide additional clarity.”

READ MORE HERE AND DOWNLOAD GUIDANCE NOTE

12.2. GUIDANCE ON PV CABLE COMPLIANCE

“ERAC has released a new advisory note providing guidance on PV cable compliance in accordance with AS/NZS 5033:2021 Clause 4.4.2.1.

AS/NZS 5033:2021 was published on 19 November 2021 and is now in effect in all states and territories in Australia.

The purpose of the document is to provide clarification on the requirements across Australia and New Zealand for the installation of above-ground PV cables. Members involved in solar installations are advised to download the advisory note and make sure electricians are familiar with all the requirements.”

READ MORE HERE AND DOWNLOAD ADVISORY NOTE


13. NEW MODELLING SHOWS 24,000 NEW RESOURCES WORKERS REQUIRED

Resources Review News in its 22 July 2022 edition reports on the release of a new forecast of resources and energy workers by AREEA. 

The article states, “Australia’s resources and energy industry will require an additional 24,000 workers by the end of 2027, according to new modelling released by the Australian Resources and Energy Employer Association (AREEA).

Resources and Energy Workforce Forecast: 2022-2027, released by AREEA today, breaks down the estimated labour required to operate new, expansion and restarted mining and oil and gas projects expected to enter production by December 2027.

The third annual edition in this series lists 107 projects as being either committed or advanced in feasibility and considered likely to proceed within the five-year period. Coincidentally, the 24,000 forecasted new workforce demand is near identical to the January 2021 edition, however coming from a larger number of projects across a very different mix of commodities.

The modelling includes 89 mining projects, with coal (22) gold (21) and critical minerals (19) being the star performers. 18 oil and gas projects are also likely to proceed within the modelled period.

Demand is significantly frontloaded within the five-year period with 69 projects expected to come online by the end of 2024, requiring 15,000 new workers.

AREEA Chief Executive Steve Knott AM said the industry would struggle to fulfil this new workforce demand without “creative solutions and a coordinated response”.

“While we will always celebrate the strength of the industry and the jobs and other benefits that come with increased project investment, given the significant skills shortages at present, many would look to these new workforce projections with some trepidation,” Mr Knott said.

“Our industry is battling the worst skills crisis in a generation. This is threatening the continuity of existing operations, resulting in temporary or permanent production downgrades, and driving other workforce issues including historic levels of staff turnover.”

Noteworthy for NSW, is that there are more than 4,600 resources and energy workers will be required to fill jobs in NSW.

READ MORE HERE


14. BREAKTHROUGH FUEL CELL RESEARCH

Editor Sandra Rossi at reports in the 19 July 2022 edition of Climate Control News (CCN) of a Japanese breakthrough in fuel cell research.  The article states, “Fuel cells often fall short when it comes to operating at temperatures beyond 100 ֯C owing to their dependence on water as a proton conduction medium.

To overcome this issue, a team of researchers from Japan designed a new hydrogen-bonded starburst-shaped metal complex consisting of ruthenium (III) ion and six imidazole-imidazolate groups.

The resulting single molecular crystal shows excellent proton conductivity even at temperatures as high as 180°C and as low as -70 °C.

As the world is moving towards more environment-friendly and sustainable sources of energy, fuel cells are receiving a lot of attention.

The main advantage of fuel cells is that they use hydrogen, a clean fuel, and produce only water as a by-product while generating electricity.

This new and clean source of electricity could replace conventional lithium-ion batteries, which currently power all modern electronic devices. 

Most fuel cells use a Nafion membrane, a synthetic polymer-based ionic membrane.

The use of water as a proton conduction medium, however, creates a major drawback for the fuel cell, namely the inability to function properly at temperatures above 100 ֯ C, the temperature at which water starts to boil, leading to a drop in proton conductivity.

Therefore, there is a need for new proton conductors that can transfer protons efficiently even at such high temperatures.

In a recent breakthrough, a team of researchers from Japan, led by …

READ MORE HERE


15. PERFORMANCE REPORT – NETWORKS PUTTING CUSTOMERS FIRST

The 21 July 2022 edition of EnergyInsider produced jointly by Energy Networks Australia (ENA) and Australian Energy Council (AEC) includes an article on how networks are putting customers first.  The article states, “The Australian Energy Regulator has just released its third report looking at the performance of Australian electricity networks.  … Each report also takes a deep dive into key focus areas, with this year’s looking into the impact of extreme events and the progress of tariff reform in further detail, both important issues to consider in the energy transition.”

The report, “2022 Electricity Network Performance Report”, “enables networks and market bodies to understand their strength and weakness in delivering an essential service at least cost to customers. This year’s document shows electricity NSPs in 2021 charged customers less for network services than at any time since 2010.”

“Consumers paid less for electricity transmission and distribution services in 2021 with network revenue being 5.6% lower than 2020, continuing its downward trend since 2015. Network maintenance and service quality were still strong, with customers experiencing fewer and shorter outages on average than in 2020.” – AER[i]

READ MORE HERE

For more, contact Lucy Moon, Energy Networks Australia


16. ELECTRIC VEHICLE SMART CHARGING ISSUES PAPER RELEASED

The Energy Security Board (ESB) advised in its 22 July 2022 ESB Update, that it has released its Electric Vehicle Smart Charging Issues Paper seeking stakeholder views on a range of issues relating to the development of effective arrangements for EV smart charging in both domestic and public settings.

Stakeholders are invited to register to attend a webinar outlining the reforms explored in the paper on Tuesday 2 August 2022, with submissions on the paper due by 19 August 2022.

The article states, “The ESB’s Electric Vehicle Smart Charging Issues Paper seeks stakeholder views on a range of issues relating to the development of effective arrangements for EV smart charging in both domestic and public settings, including the need for:

  • Residential equipment standards and an intention, where possible, to promote alignment across jurisdictions;
  • Consideration of international experience / settings to consider how relevant settings could be developed / adapted in the NEM;
  • Interoperability standards – supporting residential interoperability and remotely managed smart charging capabilities; and
  • Policy settings that allow for the growth of private investment in public charging.

Download a copy of the Issues Paper: Electric Vehicle Smart Charging – Issues Paper

READ MORE HERE


17. DELIVERING THE FUTURE OF GAS THROUGH AUSTRALIA’S GREEN HYDROGEN DEMONSTRATION

The Australian Pipeliner in its 19 July 2022 newsletter takes a look at the $15 million Western Sydney Green Gas project, which is a five-year trial that will convert solar and wind power into hydrogen gas, via electrolysis.  It will be then will then be stored for use across the Jemena Gas Network in New South Wales, the biggest gas distribution network in Australia.

The article states, “Zinfra, a leading engineering, project management, construction, operations and maintenance services provider, is Jemena’s project delivery partner, helping to execute the innovative project, which will explore how existing gas infrastructure can play a significant role in a green energy future.

The project will be co-funded by the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) who has committed $7.5 million in funding for the project. If the demonstration of hydrogen blending in the gas network, storage and electricity generation as ancillary service is successful, the solution could be expanded and replicated across Australia.

Zinfra’s Renewable Project Manager, Jarrod Irving, says that by working with Jemena on Australia’s most comprehensive green hydrogen demonstration project, Zinfra was not only able to understand the future potential integration of hydrogen within existing gas networks, but also use the experience to upskill its field force in working with hydrogen.

“We are currently going through a massive change in the energy landscape, and hydrogen could provide a solution to the energy trilemma of reliability, affordability and sustainability – through networks supplying decarbonised gas to consumers and as an energy storage mechanism,” Irving says.

“This transition is well supported within Zinfra thanks to its leading capabilities across both the electricity and gas sectors, in which hydrogen will play a significant role, whether it be through intermittent storage, electricity generation or network injection.”

READ MORE HERE